Redwood City and Prohibition

In 1908 the Redwood City Council adopted an ordinance regulating the liquor trade. A year later, saloons were banned within 200 feet of a school, meaning at least three of the four saloons on Broadway would have to close.  Around this time, the “family men” began forming fraternal organizations that allowed husbands to drink with their friends without rubbing elbows “with the rougher elements” that patronized saloons.

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Redwood City Saloons: More than just a Watering Hole

Throughout Redwood City history, saloons served an important purpose for hard-working lumbermen, fisherman and construction workers. Upon returning to town after work, they’d quickly clean up at the bath house, put on a fresh shirt and head to the local saloon. Here they came looking not only for refreshing drinks and comfort food, but to connect with friends, hear the latest gossip, get important services and learn about important news that might impact their daily lives. 

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Historical Blog Series: Redwood City Fire Department Part I: 1861–1987

In September of 1861 community members called a meeting to organize which later became known as “Redwood City Fire Company №1.” In 1889 the Fire Company asked the town trustees to take over the Fire Company as they were unable to maintain it. The town trustees agreed and immediately ordered a hook-and-ladder wagon and a hose cart, starting what would become the Redwood City Fire Department (RCFD) as it is known today.

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Historical Blog Series: Mezes Park (Tank Park)

Redwood City boasts a rich history that goes back to the days of the Gold Rush. The story of how the community grew from a tiny village on Redwood Creek into the city that it is today is reflected in some of our park names. For example, Mezes Park, nicknamed “Tank Park,” is named after someone who played a prominent role in creating today’s Redwood City — Simon M. Mezes.

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Historical Blog Series: Sequoia High School

Established in 1895, Sequoia High School was the first secondary educational institution between San Francisco and Santa Clara. By 1920 a larger campus and school was needed. Roy W. Cloud, Superintendent of Schools of San Mateo County, made a request to the purchase land at El Camino Real and Brewster to be used as the site for the new  campus. Students occupied this campus in 1924, and to this day students attend class on the same property.

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